Monday, October 7, 2013

Medicaid money a boon for wellness in schools

Most school districts have gotten used to shrinking or stagnating funding streams in recent years, but there’s at least one pot of money that’s defied that trend. Administrators across Colorado are quick to call it “amazing,” “unbelievable” and “wonderful.”


It comes in the form of Medicaid reimbursements for therapy or personal care services provided to low-income special education students by their school districts. Regardless of whether districts choose to participate in the Medicaid reimbursement program, federal law requires them to find the money to provide special education services. Thus, districts that join the Medicaid program are able to recoup some of the money that they would have spent anyway.
The payments, which can total millions in the biggest districts, must be used for health-related expenses by law. While special education equipment or staffing certainly qualify, increasingly school districts are using the money for health and wellness efforts that touch all students.
This may mean suicide prevention curriculum, anti-bullying programs, more mental health personnel, or efforts to curb obesity. It can also take the form of health and wellness coordinators tasked with leading health policy discussions at the district level and establishing school wellness teams and initiatives. Many districts also use a portion of the money to reach out to families who don’t have health insurance, in an effort to connect them to Medicaid, CHP+ or some other form of coverage.
By Ann Schimke 

For the rest of the story, go to Ed News Colorado.

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