Wednesday, May 22, 2013

CDC Launches National Media Campaign Urging Smokers to Talk with their Doctors about Quitting

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention launched its second annual Tips from Former Smokers national tobacco education campaign in April and has already driven an additional 200,000 smokers to call to 1-800-QUIT NOW. Today, CDC launched a new dimension of the campaign that urges smokers to talk with their doctors about quitting.  

Tobacco is still the leading cause of preventable death and disease in Colorado. More than 70 percent of smokers say they want to quit. Yet only about half of them talk to their doctors about their tobacco use. Research shows that such conversations between doctor and patient can double the odds that a smoker will successfully quit.

Beginning May 22, health care providers will have access to a variety of materials, including waiting room posters that can be downloaded from www.cdc.gov/tobacco/campaign/tips/hcp  and a looped video for use in clinic waiting rooms at www.plowsharegroup.com/cdctips. From May 27 through June 2, their patients will see Tips 2013 emotionally charged television ads that portray the destruction caused by smoking and secondhand smoke and end with the tag line "You can quit. Talk to your Doctor." 

To take advantage of this media campaign, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is reaching out to health care providers throughout Colorado with a letter from Chief Medical Officer Dr. Chris Urbina urging colleagues to use the campaign's resources and talk to every patient about smoking. CDPHE has also recorded videos of physicians on the Colorado Tobacco Review Committee who give their perspective on the importance of such conversations and offer tips on how to talk to patients.

“Smokers have told us that hard-hitting, emotionally powerful ads like these provide the motivation they need," said CDC Director Tom Frieden. "We hope doctors will offer evidence based counseling and medications to all patients who can benefit from them."

Dr. Pamela Talley, Lead Physician, Wardenburg Health Center, University of Colorado Boulder, talks about her experience helping smokers quit - 

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