Wednesday, March 28, 2012

Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975–2008

Featuring Cancers Associated with Excess Weight and Lack of Sufficient Physical Activity

A new study shows that death rates among men, women, and children from all cancers combined continued to decline in the United States between 2004 and 2008. Mortality rates decreased, on average, 1.6 percent per year from 2004 through 2008. During that same period, cancer incidence rates among men decreased by an average of 0.6 percent per year, while incidence rates among women declined 0.5 percent per year from 1998 through 2006, and leveled off from 2006 through 2008.

The data are included in the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2008, published in the May issue of CANCER. This year, as in previous years, the study was conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in collaboration with the American Cancer Society (ACS), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR).

This year’s report highlights a special section on cancers associated with excess weight and lack of sufficient physical activity. Esophageal adenocarcinoma, and cancers of the colon and rectum, kidney, pancreas, and endometrium, as well as breast cancer among postmenopausal women, are associated with being overweight or obese. Several of these cancers also are associated with not being sufficiently physically active.

Significant Study Findings
  • Overall cancer death rates have continued to decrease since the early 1990s among men, women, and children. 
  • For the second consecutive year, there was a decrease in lung cancer mortality rates among women. Lung cancer death rates in men have been decreasing since the early 1990s.
  • Colorectal cancer incidence rates decreased among men and women from 1999 through 2008. 
  • Breast cancer incidence rates among women declined from 1999 through 2004 and plateaued from 2004 through 2008. 
  • Incidence rates of some cancers – pancreatic, kidney, thyroid, and liver, as well as melanoma – increased from 1999 through 2008. 
  • Among children aged 19 years or younger, cancer incidence rates increased 0.6 percent per year from 2004 through 2008, continuing trends from 1992, while death rates decreased 1.3 percent per year during the same period. 
  • Among racial and ethnic groups, the highest cancer incidence rates between 2004 and 2008 were among black men and white women. Cancer death rates from 2004 through 2008 were highest among black men and black women, but these groups showed the largest declines for the period between 1999 and 2008, compared with other racial groups. 
Click here for access to the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975–2008, Featuring Cancers Associated with Excess Weight and Lack of Sufficient Physical Activity.
For more information about the collaborators, please visit the following sites:

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