Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Public health job openings


CDPHE
  • The Laboratory Services Division is recruiting for a Laboratory Technologist. This is a two year term limited position. Employment can not be guaranteed beyond December 31, 2018. The announcement is open to all Colorado residents and is scheduled to be posted through January 18, 2017, or until an adequate applicant pool has been identified, whichever comes first. As such, applicants are strongly encouraged to apply early. 

  • The Regulatory Development and Outreach Unit within the Air Pollution Control Division is recruiting for a Communications Specialist.  The announcement is open to all Colorado residents and will remain open until January 18, 2017, or until an adequate applicant pool has been identified, whichever comes first. As such, applicants are strongly encouraged to apply early.

  • The Laboratory Services Division is recruiting for a Molecular Biologist. The announcement is open to all Colorado residents and will remain open until January 23, 2017, or until an adequate applicant pool has been identified, whichever comes first. As such, applicants are strongly encouraged to apply early.

  • The Laboratory Services Division is recruiting for a Director of the Laboratory Services Division. The announcement is open to all Colorado residents and is scheduled to be posted through January 31, 2017, or until an adequate applicant pool has been identified, whichever comes first.

  • The Disease Control and Environmental Epidemiology Division is recruiting for an Immunization Compliance Inspector. The announcement is open to all Colorado residents and is scheduled to post through January 24, 2017, or once 30 qualified applications are received, whichever comes first. As such, applicants are encouraged to apply early.

  • The Health Facilities and Emergency Medical Services Division is recruiting for a Data and EMS Systems Statistical Analyst.The announcement is open to all Colorado residents and is scheduled to close on January 24, 2017, or until an adequate applicant pool has been identified, whichever comes first.

  • The Water Quality Division is recruiting for a Water Quality Regulatory Specialist. This is a term-limited position and funding cannot be guaranteed beyond December 31, 2019. The incumbent in this position must be willing and able to resign on this date or when funds run out, whichever comes first. This announcement is open to all Colorado residents and is scheduled to post through January 25, 2017, or once 50 qualified applications are received, whichever comes first. As such, applicants are strongly encouraged to apply early.

  • The Administrative and Financial Services Division is recruiting for an Accounts Receivable Unit Manager.  The announcement is open to all Colorado residents and is scheduled to be posted through January 25, 2017, or until an adequate applicant pool has been identified, whichever comes first. As such, applicants are strongly encouraged to apply early.

  • The Disease Control and Environmental Epidemiology Division is recruiting for a Term-Limited Gonorrhea, Chlamydia, and PrEP Investigator. This is a term-limited position and funding cannot be guaranteed beyond September 30, 2018. The incumbent in this position must be willing and able to resign on this date or when funds run out, whichever comes first. The announcement is open to all Colorado residents and scheduled to post through January 26, 2017, or once 50 qualified applications are received, whichever comes first. As such, Applicants are encouraged to apply early.

  • The Office of Health Equity is recruiting for a HE & EJ Training Coordinator. This is a term-limited position and funding cannot be guaranteed beyond June 30, 2018. The incumbent in this position must be willing and able to resign on this date or when funds run out , whichever comes first. This announcement is open to all Colorado residents and will remain open until February 1, 2017, or when an adequate applicant pool has been identified, whichever comes first. As such, applicants are encouraged to apply early.

Grand Junction
  • The Health Facilities and Emergency Medical Services Division Grand, Junction office is recruiting for a Health Facilities Compliance Inspector. The announcement is open to all Colorado residents and will remain open until January 23, 2017, or until we have identified a qualified applicant pool, whichever comes first.

Pueblo
  • The Disease Control and Environmental Epidemiology Division is recruiting for a Bilingual Southern Regional Consultant. The announcement is open to all Colorado residents and is scheduled to post through January 26, 2017, or once 30 qualified applications are received, whichever comes first. As such, applicants are encouraged to apply early.


Colorado School of Public Health
  • The Rocky Mountain Public Health Training Center is recruiting for a part-time University Staff (unclassified) Training Facilitator. (enter “Training Facilitator” in keyword search). Applications will be accepted until finalists are identified, but full consideration will be given to complete applications received by January 27, 2017. Those who do not apply by January 27, 2017 may or may not be considered.

The Colorado Office of Health Equity is Hiring a Trainer

The office is seeking diverse individuals with a dynamic skill set who will be responsible for the day-to-day administration, program evaluation and technical support within the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.

In this role, the HE/EJ Trainer will expand upon the existing department infrastructure around health equity and environmental justice training needs while also assessing and responding to emerging departmental training needs. Under the direction of the Director of the Office of Health Equity the health equity and environmental justice training coordinator will coordinate technical support, communications and evaluation. This position will create both web-based and in-person HE/EJ trainings designed to meet the needs of the various department divisions and external stakeholders as appropriate.

Applications will be accepted through February 1, but we encourage individuals to apply early. The full job annoucement can be found HERE.

Thursday, January 12, 2017

Rural Americans at higher risk of death from five leading causes

A new CDC study demonstrates that Americans living in rural areas are more likely to die from five leading causes than their urban counterparts. In 2014, many deaths among rural Americans were potentially preventable, including 25,000 from heart disease, 19,000 from cancer, 12,000 from unintentional injuries, 11,000 from chronic lower respiratory disease, and 4,000 from stroke. The percentages of deaths that were potentially preventable were higher in rural areas than in urban areas. The report and a companion commentary are part of a new rural health series in CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Some 46 million Americans — 15 percent of the U.S. population — currently live in rural areas. Several demographic, environmental, economic, and social factors might put rural residents at higher risk of death from these public health conditions. Residents of rural areas in the United States tend to be older and sicker than their urban counterparts. They have higher rates of cigarette smoking, high blood pressure, and obesity. Rural residents report less leisure-time physical activity and lower seatbelt use than their urban counterparts. They also have higher rates of poverty, less access to healthcare, and are less likely to have health insurance.

In the study, mortality data for U.S. residents was analyzed from the National Vital Statistics SystemCounties were placed in two categories—urban or rural—based on the NCHS urban-rural classification scheme for counties. The current study found that unintentional injury deaths were approximately 50 percent higher in rural areas than in urban areas, partly due to greater risk of death from motor vehicle crashes and opioid overdoses. Also, because of the distance between healthcare facilities and trauma centers, rapid access to specialized care can be more challenging for people injured in rural areas.

The gaps in health can be addressed. For example, healthcare providers in rural areas can:
·         Screen patients for high blood pressure and make control a quality improvement goal. High blood pressure is a leading risk factor for heart disease and stroke.
·         Increase cancer prevention and early detection. Rural healthcare providers should participate in the state-level comprehensive control coalitions. Comprehensive cancer control programs focus on cancer prevention, education, screening, access to care, support for cancer survivors, and overall good health.
·         Encourage physical activity and healthy eating to reduce obesity. Obesity has been linked to a variety of serious chronic illnesses, including diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and arthritis.
·         Promote smoking cessation. Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the United States and is the most significant risk factor for chronic lower respiratory disease.
·         Promote motor vehicle safety. Rural healthcare providers should encourage patients to always wear a seat belt and counsel parents and child care providers to use age- and size-appropriate car seats, booster seats, and seat belts on every trip.
·         Engage in safer prescribing of opioids for pain. Healthcare providers should follow the CDC guideline when prescribing opioids for chronic pain and educate patients on the risks and benefits of opioids and using nonpharmacologic therapies to provide greater benefit.

Not all deaths can be prevented. Some rural areas might have characteristics that put residents at higher risk of death, such as long travel distances to specialty and emergency care or exposures to specific environmental hazards. It’s also possible that excessively high death rates could signal a need for improved public health programs that support healthier behaviors and neighborhoods or better access to health care services.

To read the entire report and companion commentary: www.cdc.gov/mmwr

For more information on rural health: www.hrsa.gov/ruralhealth

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Healthy Beverage Partnership launches a new regional marketing campaign, Hidden Sugar

Healthy Beverage Partnership (HBP), a Cancer, Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Disease Program (CCPD) initiative facilitated by Denver Public Health, has launched a new regional marketing campaign, Hidden Sugar. The HBP is a collaboration between six Denver Metro local public health and environment agencies working to reduce sugary drink consumption through organizational policy adoption at community venues. The campaign will run throughout January and February, and again in May. Metro area residents may see it on TV, billboards, online, or hear it on the radio. The goal of the Hidden Sugar campaign is to make it easy for parents and caregivers to see how much hidden sugar is in many of the drinks our children drink and to choose healthy alternatives.

Members of the Healthy Beverage Partnership are requesting that partners help share the campaign with parents and caregivers. Attached is toolkit that includes English and Spanish templates to share the campaign message including a handout/poster, social media posts, newsletter articles, talking points, and health facts.

Children's Hospital earns highest recognition for healthy food environment


The Colorado Department of Public Health and the Environment is proud to recognize Children’s Hospital Colorado as the first hospital in the Colorado Healthy Hospital Compact to achieve platinum status, the highest recognition level, for its exceptional efforts in developing a healthy food environment for its patients and their families, visitors and staff. Compact hospitals contribute to Governor John Hickenlooper’s goal of making Colorado the “healthiest state” by promoting healthier food and beverage choices and providing breastfeeding support to new families.  


All Compact hospitals agree to offer and promote healthier food and beverage options in their cafeterias, vending machines and patient menus and follow best practices in breastfeeding support to new moms. Compact hospitals agree to work across four improvement areas: Healthy Food, Healthy Beverage, Marketing and Breastfeeding Support. Children’s Hospital Colorado has met the highest standards in each of these areas.  


Children’s Hospital Colorado, a founding partner of the Compact, recognized early on the importance of cultivating a hospital environment that supports the development of sustainable healthy habits for the children and families it serves and the health professionals it employs. Since joining the Compact, Children’s Hospital Colorado has implemented a health-focused cafeteria station called the Light Side; new, healthier kid’s menu options; and expanded salad bar options. Children’s also revised its room service menu and implemented a stoplight system of green, red and yellow labels with clear, easy-to-read nutritional information to help customers identify healthier food options.   


Children’s implemented other initiatives to achieve achieve platinum status, including:
  • Decreased stock of sugar-sweetened beverages from 40 percent to 20 percent
  • Increased the availability of healthier pre-packaged or snack foods by 40 percent
  • Increased the cost of less healthy food and beverage products and decreased the cost of healthy products to provide incentives to choose healthier food.
  • Promoted and discounted only food and beverages that met Compact health criteria

“Children’s Hospital Colorado sets an example of what it means to be a whole health provider by cultivating  an environment that promotes health for patients, visitors and staff,” says Dr. Larry Wolk Executive Director and Chief Medical Officer of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, We commend Children’s Hospital Colorado on its achievement and for leading the way for Compact hospitals.”

Colorado Health Foundation grants available

The Colorado Health Foundation Header
The Colorado Health Foundation's next grant application deadline is Feb. 15, 2017. We invite you to visit our new website and view our funding calendar to learn more about our open funding opportunities, which include:
  • Activating Places and Spaces TogetherThis funding opportunity supports place-specific efforts to get people outdoors and actively engaged in their neighborhoods through activating existing infrastructure in public places.
  • Change CapitalThis invite-only initiative will support organizations that are interested in exploring and assessing their business models and capital structures with the Nonprofit Finance Fund to build financial strength and adaptability.
  • Energizing Tween ScenesThe goal of this funding opportunity is to promote and support quality physical activity for tweens by increasing access to tween-focused public spaces.
  • Health Insurance LiteracyThis initiative is designed to support organizations seeking to improve health insurance literacy by increasing opportunities for individuals to gain information on how to better understand and use health insurance.
  • Strengthening Primary CareThis initiative, in partnership with Vital Healthcare Capital, aims to increase the number of Coloradans receiving quality primary care services through grant and loan funds for physical and health information technology infrastructure as well as working capital related to expansion or improvements to care delivery.

USDA announces $27 million in local food grants

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) announced the availability of $27 million in grants to fund innovative projects designed to strengthen market opportunities for local and regional food producers and businesses.

AMS today announced the request for applications for the Farmers Market and Local Food Promotion Program, which includes Farmers Market Promotion Program (FMPP) and Local Food Promotion Program (LFPP) grants, and the Federal-State Marketing Improvement Program (FSMIP). These programs and other resources across USDA are helping to revitalize rural America by supporting local and regional food stakeholders.

AMS will host a webinar for potential FMPP and LFPP grant applicants Feb. 15 and a teleconference for potential FSMIP grant applicants Feb. 16. For more information about FSMIP, FMPP and LFPP, visit: www.ams.usda.gov/AMSgrants. The website also contains a link to a grants decision tree, "What AMS Grant is Right for ME?”, to help applicants determine which AMS grant fits their project best. The grant applications for FSMIP, FMPP and LFPP must be submitted electronically through www.grants.gov/ by March 27. AMS will host a webinar to introduce potential applicants to Grants.gov on Feb. 8.